Hear the Weird Sounds of a Black Hole Singing

A black hole can't scream in space, but it can sing.

Researchers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory discovered ripples in the X-ray emission of a large galaxy cluster in the constellation Perseus. 

They were 30,000 light-year pressure waves blasting outward through the thin, ultrahot gas that suffuses galaxy clusters. They were triggered by frequent explosions from a supermassive black hole in the cluster's nucleus, 250 million light-years away.

The sound waves had a period of 10 million years and were equivalent to a B-flat 57 octaves below middle C, a tone that the black hole has presumably held for two billion years.

Scientists at NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory recently “sonified” these ripples by speeding up their signals 57 or 58 octaves and raising their frequency quadrillions of times. So now we can hear the interplanetary sirens.

This is all part of NASA's annual "Black Hole Week" social media event, May 2-6. This week's announcement is actually a lead-up to huge news on May 12, when the Event Horizon Telescope announces its latest findings.

This is all part of NASA's annual "Black Hole Week" social media event, May 2-6. This week's announcement is actually a lead-up to huge news on May 12, when the Event Horizon Telescope announces its latest findings.

Stay Updated
With

           Our
Latest Stories!